04 April 2017

Princess Josephine, 10/16/2006 - 3/30/2017

Four years ago, I wrote about how my cat Josephine came into my life. It breaks my heart to now have to write about how she left it last Thursday (30 March). I wrote this originally in a Facebook post that evening, primarily as a means of informing as many of my family and friends all at once as I could, sparing me from having to type it out repeatedly. I haven't been able, however, to bring myself to write a blog post about her. I don't know why I should distinguish between the two, as though somehow whatever I write on Facebook is inferior to what I would write here. That curiosity is for another time, though. For now, I've just chosen to copy and paste because there really isn't much for me to add.

My favorite picture of Josephine.
Josephine had exhibited nothing whatsoever to indicate anything was wrong, so her passing was entirely unexpected. Her behavior up to the time I went to bed was completely typical. She was energetic, had an appetite, was affectionate as ever.... I need to believe that whatever happened, happened suddenly and that she was spared any suffering.

Almost every night for the last decade, Jos has purred me to sleep. When I haven't felt well and was whiny, I'd beg her to come to bed just so I could fall asleep. Time and again, she would dutifully come tend to me, even when I could tell she just wanted to get back up and go do whatever it was she wanted to do. When I've been inpatient, whether for Crohn's or mental issues, I've relied on the muscle memory of snuggling with her to coax myself into sleep.

She really was a soulmate, and I mean that in its truest sense. We just belonged together. She made me feel accepted and loved in ways that no one else has; no other pet, and not even any human. I don't mean to slight anyone when I say this.

She was amazingly patient with me. I would pick out her eye crusties. Sometimes I would muss with her head, as I did on our final night together, just to see how much she would tolerate. I always gave up before she did. She could not have been more docile (unless you ask Muffin, whom she unfortunately and surprisingly did take to bullying over the last year and a half).

Jos was so close to me that my absence was a source of separation anxiety for her. Even just going upstairs set off a timer for her, and when it expired, she would mew until I finally returned. She didn't really need me to do anything to make her feel better except just to have me back in her field of vision. That was enough to content her.

I'm still too stunned to feel much of anything else. I feel an expected emptiness which I know the passage of time will help alleviate. I can't imagine, though, that going to bed will ever not feel empty after this loss.

My imagination was entirely right about that last point. Going to bed has been truly painful. That first night, I tried clutching a throw pillow. I threw it after maybe a full minute, rejecting the unacceptable substitute for my princess. I can get through being awake okay-ish, but even the act of physically getting into bed is agonizing. I haven't been able to fall or stay asleep for days now.

Jos indulging my by wearing an elf hat, Christmas, 2011.
Note: I have no idea when Josephine was actually born. 16 October is her "birthday (observed)", as that is the day that the incident involving Josephine Baker, for whom she was named, took place. This is recounted in the piece I mentioned in my opening remarks that I wrote about her a few years ago. I'll spare you having to scroll back up for the link in case you're interested. It's right here.

08 February 2017

Senator Rand Paul on the Confirmation of Betsy DeVos

I wrote recently in this blog about my concerns of the nomination of Betsy DeVos to the cabinet position of Secretary of Education. I included the content of the letter I sent to Senators Mitch McConnell and Rand Paul in that post. I was unable to get through to Senator McConnell's offices, but I was able to get through to Senator Paul's. I recited the content of my letter to the receptionist. I knew that was unnecessary, but I hoped it might be cathartic to know someone in that office had to actually listen to my words. I received no such catharses. Both Senators voted to confirm DeVos, over the objections of so many protests that phone lines were either overwhelmed or shut down entirely. Senator Paul sent the following email:

February 7, 2017

Dear Mr. McClain,

Thank you for taking the time to contact me regarding the nomination and confirmation of Elisabeth "Betsy" DeVos to become Secretary of Education. I appreciate hearing your thoughts on her nomination. 
Providing advice and consent on personnel appointments and nominations is one of the most important duties of the United States Senate. As I have in the past, I carefully evaluate each nominee on the basis of their record, qualifications and their demonstrated commitment to upholding and defending the U.S. Constitution. Like you, I believe it is critically important to place only the most qualified individuals in positions of such importance.
Mrs. Betsy DeVos was nominated by President Donald Trump on November 23, 2016. Following a nomination hearing on January 17, 2017, the Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions (HELP) Committee reported the nominee favorably by a vote of 12-11. Mrs. DeVos is a school-choice advocate, philanthropist, and pillar in the education reform community. Mrs. DeVos and I share the belief that when it comes to education, the federal government has been more of a hindrance than a help. Her emphasis on the provision of choice to administrators, teachers, and parents refocuses us as a nation towards the children we are educating. Therefore, I voted to confirm Mrs. DeVos as the Secretary of Education in the HELP Committee and on the Senate floor. On February 7, 2017, Secretary DeVos' nomination was confirmed by the Senate by a vote of 51-50.
Again, thank you for contacting my office. It is an honor and a privilege to represent the Commonwealth of Kentucky in the United States Senate. For more information on these topics as well as my many other legislative initiatives, feel free to visit my website at www.paul.senate.gov.


Sincerely, 

          Rand Paul, MD
          United States Senator 

26 January 2017

On Kentucky Senate Bill 48

Senate Bill 48 was introduced three weeks ago, but I only just learned about it. Here's the official summary (emphasis mine):
     Amend KRS 173.480, relating to public library districts' initial board appointments, to allow a county judge/executive with the approval of the fiscal court to appoint the first members of the newly created library board when any of the prospective appointees presented to the judge, in the judge's opinion, are not suitable; amend KRS 173.490, relating to public library districts, to allow a county judge/executive with the approval of the fiscal court to appoint members or fill vacancies of the library board when any of the prospective appointees presented to the judge, in the judge's opinion, are not suitable; amend KRS 173.725, relating to petition-created library districts' initial board appointments, to allow a county judge/executive with the approval of the fiscal court to appoint the first members of the newly created library board when any of the prospective appointees presented to the judge, in the judge's opinion, are not suitable; amend KRS 173.730, relating to library districts created by petition, to allow a county judge/executive with the approval of the fiscal court to appoint members or fill vacancies of the library board when any of the prospective appointees presented to the judge, in the judge's opinion, are not suitable.
Maybe I've been made skittish by the pushes by Republicans in other states, like North Carolina and North Dakota, and maybe it's a residual effect of having read Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451, but when I read a bill placing library boards at the mercy of a county judge/executive's "opinion" about who is "suitable", I become apprehensive. To that end, I've written a letter to my state senator, which I've seen fit to republish here.

Senator Harris,

I am a constituent of yours and I am writing you concerning Senate Bill 48, pertaining to library boards. Specifically, the bill would allow county judges/executives to replace board members when, "in the judge's opinion, are not suitable" (directly quoted from several passages in said bill).

This smacks of partisan efforts to exert control over our public libraries, not to support our librarians, but to micromanage them to suit the ideological whims of county executives. The danger of implicit censorship could not be clearer.

In Oldham County, we have been blessed with a fantastic library system. To a person, the staff has been consistently insightful and helpful for as long as I've been going, which dates back to my childhood in the early 80's. Our librarians work hard to understand and meet the needs of our community. SB48, by its very existence, denies that and threatens to remove from them the autonomy under which they have operated to date.

I ask that you stand with our librarians and oppose SB48. Let your colleagues know that their efforts need to be put to work securing reliable, affordable health care and bringing quality jobs to the state, and not in trying to micromanage a community system that has flourished without their intervention.

Respectfully,
Travis McClain

I would encourage all Kentuckians to take a few moments to dash off a message to their state senators and ask them to reject SB48. You can find your senator here.

19 January 2017

On the Confirmation of Betty DeVos as Education Secretary

There is a call to action from citizens to urge their Senators to vote not to confirm President-Elect Trump's nominee for Education Secretary, Betty DeVos. You can join the effort here. I wrote a letter to my Senators, Mitch McConnell and Rand Paul. I've decided to make it an open letter by also publishing it here.

UPDATE 30 JANUARY
More effective than writing letters, though, is to actually call your Senators' offices. Letters can be ignored, but phones have to be answered! You can find your state's Senators' contact numbers on the official Senate website's directory here. As of this update, only three more Senators are needed to commit to rejecting DeVos's confirmation. It's doable, but the clock is ticking!

I am a constituent who grew up in Oldham County. Our schools have been fantastic, to the point of leading numerous families to defect from Louisville to see that their children had the best possible education opportunity they could provide.

I went on to complete my bachelor's studies at the University of Louisville, where I was one of only nine students in my graduating class to major in history and graduate cum laude or better. I saw time and again while I was in those classrooms that my education in Oldham County had brilliantly prepared me for college.

At times, I have certainly felt sorry for my fellow Kentuckians who didn't have the same opportunity I enjoyed. There is no question whatsoever that our education system has room for improvement.

To that end, like several of my closest friends, I intended to go into teaching myself. As I was preparing for my senior year at UofL, though, I developed Crohn's disease. I quickly learned that it isn't compatible with the classroom even as a student, and I was dissuaded from even trying to earn my Master's, let alone becoming a teacher myself. That breaks my heart every day, I can assure you.

But I know the character and caliber of my friends and their colleagues. They *are* making a difference in their various schools, from preschool to high school, teaching math, language arts, music, social studies, science, art, and special needs. They are singularly devoted to their students, and in seeing to it that every child they teach is engaged, inspired, supported, and aided in his or her journey. It is difficult work, to be sure, which is why they need the support of a Secretary of Education who understands and appreciates the demands, responsibilities, and ambitions of that work.

I am writing you now regarding the nomination of Betty DeVos to become our next Education Secretary.

I recognize that Mrs. DeVos has taken a keen interest in our education system, but that interest is insufficient qualification for such an instrumental posting. Like millions of other concerned citizens, I followed her confirmation hearing closely. I was dismayed by her refusal to commit to protecting the rights of disabled and LGBTQ students.

I am similarly bothered by her conspicuous avoidance when asked whether she would continue to uphold Title IX, particularly in regard to its application to address the very serious matter of campus sexual violence.

Our students deserve better than the glib "vision" that Mrs. DeVos has put forth. They deserve to attend schools that are given clear leadership and necessary support from the Education Secretary. Their teachers deserve that same leadership and support. Mrs. DeVos has demonstrated that she does not understand or value those needs, and as your constituent, I respectfully urge you to use your vote to tell the incoming President to find another nominee for the post who deserves to occupy it.

With respect,

Travis S. McClain